Fire Disaster Management

Fire detection in various spectral regions: Fire detection (A=visible; B=shortwave-IR; C=midwave-IR; D=longwave-IRFire detection in various spectral regions: Fire detection (A=visible; B=shortwave-IR; C=midwave-IR; D=longwave-IR

Fire detection and response

RIT's Laboratory for Imaging Algorithms and Systems (LIAS) and Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing (DIRS) Group have a long track record in remote sensing of wildfires. These groups have researched fire detection, extent, and fire line mapping using thermal sensing platforms, e.g., the WASP and WASP-Lite sensors. An example of fire detection in the various spectral regions can be seen on the right, while fire extent and fire line mapping is shown below.

Fire Line Mapping: A fire perimeter line derived from imagery taken over a wildfireFire Line Mapping: A fire perimeter line derived from imagery taken over a wildfire

Temporal Assessment of Wildfires: A sequence of images taken over time of a wildfire in Kentucky with the WASP-Lite sensor.Temporal Assessment of Wildfires: A sequence of images taken over time of a wildfire in Kentucky with the WASP-Lite sensor.

Temporal fire assessment using direct downlink capability

RIT's WASP sensor enables multi-temporal, real-time mapping using RGB, shortwave-infrared, midwave-infrared, and longwave-infrared cameras (right): Each camera frame is geo-rectified on board the aircraft using inertial measurement unit (IMU) and digital elevation model (DEM) information. The group is developing the capability to downlink data to a ground receiving station through a radio-frequency (RF) link (below) - this will enable real-time display and use of image data, as well as image-based products, in a disaster management scenario.

Real-time data: Real-time image download (left) and flight tracking (right) from the WASP system via an RF-downlinkReal-time data: Real-time image download (left) and flight tracking (right) from the WASP system via an RF-downlink